Generate Authentic Classroom Conversation with Google Forms

There’s nothing I love more than Google Forms. Okay, that’s not true. I love my husband, my children, and Bordeaux candies from See’s Chocolates way more more than I love Google Forms, but when it comes to generating authentic classroom discussion, Google Forms ranks supreme. I also love how using Google Forms in the classroom helps me save paper!

One way I use Google Forms in my classroom is for class review. If my students have an important test or quiz coming up, I’ll create a Google Form with multiple-choice, review questions. I’ll instruct my students to quickly complete the class review form, which is essentially a quiz in itself. (One of the benefits of this activity is that I get to see the real value that this review has by comparing students’ review scores to their actual quiz scores). Completing the review question Google Form is not the review though. In fact, I prefer if students complete the form quickly and choose the answer that they first think is correct. The real magic for this review begins when I project a summary of the answers on the overhead.


Right after students complete the form, they get to see the colorful charts and graphs that contain all of the data from every single student’s Form. Projecting these graphic on the overhead, I will then discuss with my students why some people answered the way they did (usually asking for evidence to support their answers) and why the correct answer is indeed the correct answer. This review strategy is amazing because not only does it prepare students for an upcoming test or quiz, but it models test-taking strategies for the students and generates a content-rich classroom discussion. Just look at the amazing graphics you can display in your classroom!

Another way I use Google Forms in my classroom is as a pre-reading anticipatory activity to survey my students and get them thinking about the various themes and issues we will read about in our next book. Before using Google Forms for this, I would use a single piece of paper for every single one of my students. And seeing as how I have roughly 150 students, that is a lot of wasted paper. However, saving paper isn’t even the best perk about using Forms for this type of activity. The most significant advantage Google Forms provides for a pre-reading anticipation activity is the ability display the students’ answers on the projector.


Once my students are done answering the anticipatory questions on Google Forms, I display the summary responses on the board. This provides students with the opportunity to see the class’ answers as a whole, which also leads to great classroom discussions. And since students can see that they might not be the only person who feels the way they do, they are much more open to sharing their ideas aloud. One of my pre-reading anticipation guides that generates some of the best classroom discussions is my SMARTePlans Night Pre-reading Anticipation Guide.


Sure, Google Forms is great because using Forms saves paper and it can serve as a self-grading quiz, but when taken to a deeper level, Google Forms provides students with data-rich, visually stimulating graphics that cultivate authentic classroom discussion. Students see all of the responses on the board, and instantly gain more confidence in their own thoughts and beliefs. Before they even volunteer to contribute, they know people will support their answers and opinions.


Read more about using Google Forms, using less paper in the classroom, and creating a digitally-supportive classroom in the classroom in these blog posts.


1 comment:

  1. I love Google Forms. I agree that it's the prefect tool for pre-reading questions, and the data provides an excellent visual to help them see what others think. And, of course, it's a great way to cut down on those piles of paper!

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